BRANDING & BIZ TIPS FROM SHEBRAND

 Originally published on ltd365.com

Originally published on ltd365.com

 

Brand consultant, creative director and personal development coach Liz Dennery Sanders of SheBrand gives us some expert advice:

What advice would you give to someone who feels overwhelmed by the competition? I don’t believe in competition, only collaboration. There’s nothing wrong with checking out what others are doing or finding wonderful role models, but there’s only one YOU. Stay focused and keep your eyes on your own ball. You’ll be a lot happier and ultimately more successful when you take small action steps each day to take care of your own business.

What top three tips would you like to pass along for those who have just started to use social media? 1. Focus on one platform at a time – don’t try to be everywhere at once; 2. Stop broadcasting – it’s a conversation, not an advertising platform; and 3. Be generous – connect with others and share their content.

When you think of the best people to work with, what traits do they share? The best people to work with are smart, enthusiastic, out-of-the-box thinkers with a “can-do” attitude.

Give a budding entrepreneur your best hiring and firing business practices. Hire slow, fire fast. And always hire for attitude and proactivity over experience.

Entrepreneurs often say that “you can’t do it all.” What three things do you always outsource? My assistant handles my day-to-day scheduling, all incoming requests for information, and general office management. And personally, I swear by the Instacart app. I can take a catnap on a Saturday instead of spending an hour at the grocery. It’s a lifesaver for a busy working mama.

What business book would you recommend to someone who is about to launch or in the early growth stage? Start with Why by Simon Sinek and The War of Art by Steven Pressfield are wonderful books for early-stage entrepreneurs.

What are your thoughts on raising capital? Make sure you’ve put a brand handbook and business plan together before moving into this stage. In other words, make sure you’ve done all of your homework and dotted all your i’s and crossed your t’s.

What piece of invaluable advice did you receive that you would like to pass on to women pursuing their dream? You don’t need permission from anyone else.

My best advice to a woman launching a venture is… Don’t let yourself get blown about by every wind. Do whatever it takes to stay grounded and strong. As author Ryan Holiday said,

“Nobody is born with a steel backbone. We have to forge that ourselves.”

What would your advice to your younger self be? You are worthy exactly as you are.

Finally, give us five tips that would benefit a woman who is launching or growing her business:

  1. Get really clear about WHO you are, WHAT you offer, and WHY you do it.
  2. It’s not about you, it’s about them – your clients, blog readers, website viewers, etc. Stop worrying so much and focus on how you can best help THEM.
  3. A brand exists in the mind of the consumer – in other words, you don’t own your brand. Branding is EVERYTHING you do to create that perception, from your business card to your website, to how you shake someone’s hand, how you dress, and how you present yourself at a speaking engagement. Pay attention to these brand touchpoints and how they affect others. You have more power than you realize in how your brand is digested and perceived.
  4. Don’t overlook the power of visual branding. Your visual identity should be consistent across all platforms – your website, biz card, social media, in person, etc. Remember, a confused mind never buys. Your visual branding is often someone’s first impression of you.
  5. Eat that frog! Take small action steps every single day to propel you forward. Intention + action = massive results. I see too many entrepreneurs set intentions, but never follow through on the action.